Science and Medicine: General Medicine

Dr. Stuart Apfel

Stuart Apfel is an Associate Professor of Neurology at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine and at Downstate Medical Center, and has recently become an adjunct faculty member at Yeshiva University where he teaches an undergraduate course in neuroscience. His scientific research has largely focused on the potential clinical application of neurotrophic factors for the treatment of peripheral neuropathy and other neurodegenerative disorders, and on other aspects of translational medicine. He is a founder of Parallax Clinical Research, a consulting firm that works closely with biotechnology companies and pharmaceutical companies assisting them with advancing potential therapeutics from the laboratory to clinical trials, and ultimately to approval. Dr. Apfel is a popular lecturer at Einstein and Downstate, and has won teaching awards. In addition to his scientific activities, he gives regular shiurim in his community of West Hempstead, and has lectured widely on a variety of Torah related topics, mostly focused on Science and Judaism, Jewish History, and topics in Tanach. Sample Titles The Evolution of the Human Brain Repairing the Nervous System Why do we age, and what can we do about it? Alzheimer’s disease – Can we reduce our risk? From a Single Cell to the Most Complicated Structure in the Known Universe – Embryonic Development of the Brain Our Aging Brain – Can We Keep it Young? Sleep and Dreaming – How and Why Learning and Memory – How it Happens and How to Improve It Understanding Modern Medical Research The Torah Perspective on the Inflationary Universe and Dark Energy Adam and Chava and the Origins of Humanity Talmudic Medicine and other forms of Alternative Medicine Does God Play Dice with the Universe? – Understanding Chance from a Torah Perspective Should a Jew Believe in Evolution? The Mind / Brain / Soul – A Torah, Scientific, and Philosophical Perspective Torah Perspective on the Human Genome Project Orion and the Pleiades from the Perspective of Chazal The God Gene – Are we Genetically Programmed to Believe in God?...

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Dr. Keith-Thomas Ayoob

Keith-Thomas Ayoob is the director of nutrition services at the Rose F. Kennedy Children’s Evaluation and Rehabilitation Center and associate professor of pediatrics at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University in New York City, where he has maintained a clinical practice for over 25 years. Dr. Ayoob is active on the national scene having been an American Dietetic Association national media spokesperson from 1995-2004. Continuing to be sought by the media for commentary on topical health and nutrition research, he has given over 1,000 interviews on television, radio and in the print media. His extensive television appearance list includes NBC’s Today Show, the CBS Morning Show, CNN, ABC’s Good Morning America, ABC World News Tonight, and PBS’s Keeping Kids Healthy. Dr. Ayoob’s sound, consumer-friendly advice is also sought by food, and healthcare, and non-profit organizations. He is on several professional advisory boards, including the Children’s Advertising Review Unit of the National Advertising Review Council, and was recently appointed to New York State’s Children in the Performing Arts Advisory Board. He is frequently an invited presenter at numerous state and national professional conferences. In 2005, he authored the book, “The Uncle Sam Diet,” based on the 2005 US Dietary Guidelines. Dr. Ayoob earned his masters and doctoral degrees in nutrition from Columbia University, and received a bachelor’s degree in nutrition science from the University of California at Davis. Sample Titles Obesity Children’s Nutrition Cardiovascular Nutrition Food Faddism Nutrition Myths and...

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Dr. Nir Barzilai

Dr. Barzilai is the Director of the Institute for Aging Research at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University. He is The Ingeborg and Ira Leon Rennert Professor of Aging Research, Professor of Medicine and Molecular Genetics and a member of the Diabetes Research Center, the Divisions of Endocrinology and Geriatrics. He is also the Director of the Diabetes Research and Training Center Physiology core. Dr. Barzilai’s interests focus on several basic mechanisms in the biology of aging, including the biological effects of nutrients on extending life and the genetic determinants of life span. Indeed, he has discovered the first longevity gene in humans, and is further characterizing the phenotype and genotype of humans with exceptional longevity through an NIH supported Program Project. He is also leading a Program Project to investigate the metabolic decline with aging and its impact on longevity. He received numerous grants, among them ones from the National Institute of Aging (NIA), American Federation of Aging Research, and the Ellison Medical Foundation. Dr. Barzilai has published over 160 peer-reviewed papers, reviews and chapters in textbooks. He is an advisor to the National Institutes of Health on several projects and initiatives and study sections. He serves on several editorial boards and is a reviewer for numerous other journals. Dr. Barzilai was a recipient of numerous prestigious awards, including the Beeson Fellow for Aging Research, the Senior Ellison Foundation award, the Paul Glenn Foundation award and the NIA- Nathan Shock Award for his contributions in elucidating metabolic and genetic mechanisms of aging, and will receive the 2010 Irving S. Wright Award of Distinction in Aging Research Award. In his capacity as the Director of the Institute for Aging research at Einstein he leads or assists in 5 large programmatic (P01) approaches to biology of aging, a training grant (T32) and has additional individual grants (R01). Sample Titles Aging...

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Rabbi Mordechai Becher

Rabbi Mordechai Becher, originally from Australia, an instructor at the James Striar School of Yeshiva University and a senior lecturer for the Gateways Organization. Rabbi Becher received his ordination from the Chief Rabbinate of Israel. He taught at Ohr Somayach, Neve Yerushalayim and Darchei Binah in Jerusalem for 15 years, served in the Israel Defence Forces and taught in a number of Rabbinic training programs. His latest book, Gateway to Judaism, published by Shaar Press, is now in its sixth printing. Rabbi Becher has lectured for the UJA, Jewish Federations, the Zionist Organization of America, Hillel and is on the speakers’ bureau of the Israeli Consulate in New York. Rabbi Becher has answered thousands of questions on the Ask-the-Rabbi website, and has taught in Canada, the United States, England, Israel, South Africa, Australia and Russia. Sample Titles “An Eye For An Eye”: What Does it Really Mean? What If We Found Moshe’s Tefillin – Archaeology and Halachah Occupied or Liberated: Whose Land Is It Anyway? Jewish State or State for Jews? The Ideal of a Jewish State in Jewish Thought Cloning in Halachah “Triage” Rationing Resources, and Priorities in Medical Emergencies The Sabbath : Who Invented the Weekend Anyway? Exile of the Body, Exile of the Soul: The Exodus as a Metaphor. Freewill and Conditioning: A Delicate Balance. Jewish Law in a Non-Jewish Society Strings Attached: The Mitzvah of Tzitzit From Cairo to Cambridge: Jewish Treasures of Egypt (Cairo Genizah A/V) A Prophet for Our Time: The Life and Philosophy of Rabbi Samson Raphael...

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Dr. Edward Burns

Dr. Edward Burns is executive dean of Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University. In this capacity, he has responsibility for the support of clinical and basic science research, the College’s doctoral and post-doctoral programs, the clinical and scientific relationships with the College’s hospital affiliates, the development of scientific discoveries into biomedical technology and the licensing of these technologies to pharmaceutical and biotechnology partners. He also oversees the College’s policies relating to the responsible conduct of research and biomedical ethics. Dr. Burns is a graduate of Yeshiva and received his medical degree from Einstein. Over a 20-year period he has been a faculty member of the College and is a professor in the departments of pathology and medicine. He served as director of clinical hematology at Einstein Hospital and vice-chairman and director of laboratories at Einstein and Montefiore hospitals. He has written more than 50 articles in medical journals and chapters in books, has authored a textbook and holds five U.S. patents for his own inventions. Since joining the Einstein faculty, Dr. Burns was awarded the Sam Rosen Award for outstanding clinical teaching and the Harry Eagle award for excellence in basic science teaching. Sample Titles What Research Has In Store for...

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Dr. Ekaterina Dadachova

Dr. Dadachova is currently the Sylvia and Robert Olnick Faculty Scholar in Cancer Research and an associate professor of nuclear medicine and microbiology and immunology at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University. She received her Bachelor of Chemistry degree in 1986 from Moscow State University, Moscow, Russia. After obtaining her PhD in physical chemistry in 1992 from the same institution she emigrated to Australia where in 1993 she started postdoctoral work at the biomedicine and health program, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization (ANSTO). Dr. Dadachova was given a task to develop a separation procedure for production of radioactive isotopes for medical applications. In 1995 she was invited as a guest scholar to Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), TN where she worked for 6 months at the production of isotopes in nuclear reactor and at making radioactive antibodies for cancer treatment. On return to ANSTO from ORNL she was promoted to research scientist position. In 1998 Dr. Dadachova was invited by Dr. Martin Brechbiel, of the National Cancer Institute, NIH to join his radioimmune and inorganic chemistry section as a visiting associate. During her 2 years at NIH she participated in all aspects of pre-clinical development and evaluation of radioactive drugs from chemistry to experimental therapy and toxicity studies. In 2000 Dr. Dadachova was recruited by the department of nuclear medicine, AECOM as assistant professor of nuclear medicine and director of radiochemistry. She has developed an active research program in novel therapies of cancer and infectious diseases using radioactive drugs. To date, Dr. Dadachova has published 91 peer-reviewed papers and is named inventor on 12 patents. Ongoing research projects in her laboratory are funded by NIH, research foundations and industry grants. She currently serves on the editorial boards of “Nuclear Medicine and Biology” and “Cancer Biotherapy and Radiopharmaceuticals” journals. Sample Titles Melanin Pigment as an Energy Transducer in Microorganisms and its Potential Applications in Bioremediation New Approaches to the Therapy of Infectious Disease Bismuth-213 in Radioimmunotherapy...

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Dr. Meredith Hawkins

Dr. Meredith Hawkins is associate professor of medicine in the diabetes research and training center at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University. Her current research interests include the regulation of hepatic glucose production by hyperglycemia per se in type 2 diabetes mellitus, and the effects of nutrient excess on metabolic features of the insulin resistance syndrome. Dr. Hawkins has a tremendous interest to restrain the burgeoning epidemic of obesity and diabetes in the developing world. During the last ten years she has worked with key institutions in Uganda, Rwanda and India, to collaborate toward this vision. Dr. Hawkins earned her M.D. degree cum laude from the University of Toronto and a Master of Science in clinical research methods cum laude from the Albert Einstein College of Medicine. She is associate editor of the “American Journal of Physiology,” and secretary treasurer of the American Federation of Medical Research. Dr. Hawkins’ current research interests include the effects of nutrient excess on insulin resistance, nutritional regulation of adipose tissue macrophages, and the regulation of hepatic glucose production by hyperglycemia per se in diabetes mellitus. Dr. Hawkins is a Beeson Scholar of the American Federation of Aging Research, and has received research grants from the National Institutes of Health, the American Diabetes Association, the Juvenile Diabetes Foundation International and the Diabetes Action Foundation International. She is the recipient of numerous honors and awards, including the Outstanding Clinical Associate Physician Award from the National Institutes of Health and the Junior Physician Scientist Award from the American Federation of Medical Research. She was recently awarded the Novartis Young Investigator award in Diabetes Research, an international prize given to the most outstanding clinical investigator under the age of 45 who is conducting diabetes or obesity research. Sample Titles Global Diabetes: Tackling the Twenty-First Century...

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Dr. Roee Holtzer

Dr. Holtzer is an assistant professor of psychology at the Ferkauf Graduate School of Psychology and of Neurology at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University. He holds an MA and a Ph.D. degree from the State University of New York at Binghamton. Dr. Holtzer completed his internship training in clinical psychology at the Rusk Institute of New York University. He also completed a T-32 post-doctoral fellowship in neuropsychology and cognition in aging at the cognitive neuroscience division of the Sergievsky Center of Columbia University Medical Center. He is licensed as a psychologist in New York State. Dr. Holtzer’s primary research interest is in cognitive aging and in the interplay between cognition, mood and motor function vis-à-vis aging and age-related diseases. Specifically, his most recently funded research proposes a three-level theory-driven approach to integrating clinical neuropsychology, cognitive neurosciences, and genetics to explore mechanisms of motor aging. The long-term goal of this translational research is to identify specific modifiable mechanisms pertinent to developing more efficient risk assessment and intervention programs of motor impairments such as decline in gait and falls in aging. Dr. Holtzer has a specific interest in attention and executive control processes and their relations to other cognitive functions, emotions and functional outcomes. His team’s recent work has identified informative associations between executive control of working memory and fatigue in Multiple Sclerosis. They aim to further explore this relationship and extend it to aging as well. Dr. Holtzer is also the director for the Clinical Health Program Minor in Neuropsychology Sample Titles Predictors of Gait and Falling in Aging Central Control of Mobility in...

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Dr. Michael Lipton

Born in Boston and raised in upstate New York and Southern California, Dr. Lipton entered the Six-Year Liberal Arts – Medicine Program at Boston University in 1983. The program, designed to develop humanistic physicians, channeled students toward the liberal arts and clinical medicine. Dr. Lipton minored in Spanish literature with a special interest in contemporary Castilian fiction (Miguel Delibes was a favorite), including study in Salamanca, Spain. Key interests during medical school were the neurosciences and, in particular, brain substrates of psychiatric disease. Nonetheless, the opportunity to exploit technology and treat disease less invasively drew Dr. Lipton to training in Diagnostic Radiology and Neuroradiology. In his first faculty appointment as assistant professor of radiology at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University, through a newly established collaborative relationship between Einstein and the Center for Advanced Brain Imaging (CABI) at the Nathan S. Kline Institute for Psychiatric Research (NKI), Dr. Lipton was immersed in neuroimaging research and developed his own research program. With the support of a National Institutes of Health Mentored Clinical Scientist Career Development Award, he completed a Ph.D. in Neuroscience at Einstein, executing work that redefined our understanding of brain organization using electrical and hemodynamic (MRI) measures. Subsequently, Dr. Lipton was promoted to associate professor of radiology, psychiatry and behavioral sciences and neuroscience at Einstein and named associate director of the Gruss Magnetic Resonance Research Center. In parallel with his basic science work, Dr. Lipton directs a program investigating mild traumatic brain injury and its effects on cognitive disability. Sample Titles Is There Any Such Thing as a Minor Head Injury? Detecting Microscopic Brain Injury in Living Humans Imaging Biomarkers to Improve Patient Care and Facilitate Novel Treatments Safety Issue in MRI: What Everyone Needs to...

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Dr. Robert Marion

Robert Marion, professor of pediatrics and obstetrics and gynecology and women’s health at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University and the Ruth L. Gottesman Professor of Developmental Pediatrics at Einstein, is the director of the Children’s Evaluation and Rehabilitation Center and the University Center of Excellence in Developmental Disabilities at the Rose F. Kennedy Center. He is chief of the divisions of genetics and of development medicine at the Children’s Hospital at Montefiore and director of the Center for Congenital Disorders. A 1979 graduate of Einstein, Dr. Marion has been a faculty member at Einstein since completion of his training in 1984. From 2002 until 2007, he served as co-director of medical student education for Einstein’s department of pediatrics. In June 2008, he became chair of Einstein’s committee on admissions. Dr. Marion’s clinical and research interests include the natural history and genetic basis of multiple malformation syndromes. He has published extensively in the medical literature and is the author of seven books including “The Intern Blues,” “The Boy Who Felt No Pain” (winner of a Christopher Award), and “Genetics Round: A Doctor’s Life in the Field that Revolutionized Medicine,” which will be published by Kaplan in October 2009. A resident of Westchester County, Dr. Marion lives with his wife, Beth Schoenbrun, a teacher at Scarsdale High School, and is the father of three children. Sample Titles Was George Washington Really the Father of Our Country? A Clinical Geneticist Looks at World History Miracles in Medical Genetics How To Get Happily Accepted to Medical School The Genetics of Autism Genomic Medicine: The Future is...

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