Science and Medicine: Aging

Dr. Stuart Apfel

Stuart Apfel is an Associate Professor of Neurology at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine and at Downstate Medical Center, and has recently become an adjunct faculty member at Yeshiva University where he teaches an undergraduate course in neuroscience. His scientific research has largely focused on the potential clinical application of neurotrophic factors for the treatment of peripheral neuropathy and other neurodegenerative disorders, and on other aspects of translational medicine. He is a founder of Parallax Clinical Research, a consulting firm that works closely with biotechnology companies and pharmaceutical companies assisting them with advancing potential therapeutics from the laboratory to clinical trials, and ultimately to approval. Dr. Apfel is a popular lecturer at Einstein and Downstate, and has won teaching awards. In addition to his scientific activities, he gives regular shiurim in his community of West Hempstead, and has lectured widely on a variety of Torah related topics, mostly focused on Science and Judaism, Jewish History, and topics in Tanach. Sample Titles The Evolution of the Human Brain Repairing the Nervous System Why do we age, and what can we do about it? Alzheimer’s disease – Can we reduce our risk? From a Single Cell to the Most Complicated Structure in the Known Universe – Embryonic Development of the Brain Our Aging Brain – Can We Keep it Young? Sleep and Dreaming – How and Why Learning and Memory – How it Happens and How to Improve It Understanding Modern Medical Research The Torah Perspective on the Inflationary Universe and Dark Energy Adam and Chava and the Origins of Humanity Talmudic Medicine and other forms of Alternative Medicine Does God Play Dice with the Universe? – Understanding Chance from a Torah Perspective Should a Jew Believe in Evolution? The Mind / Brain / Soul – A Torah, Scientific, and Philosophical Perspective Torah Perspective on the Human Genome Project Orion and the Pleiades from the Perspective of Chazal The God Gene – Are we Genetically Programmed to Believe in God?...

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Dr. Nir Barzilai

Dr. Barzilai is the Director of the Institute for Aging Research at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University. He is The Ingeborg and Ira Leon Rennert Professor of Aging Research, Professor of Medicine and Molecular Genetics and a member of the Diabetes Research Center, the Divisions of Endocrinology and Geriatrics. He is also the Director of the Diabetes Research and Training Center Physiology core. Dr. Barzilai’s interests focus on several basic mechanisms in the biology of aging, including the biological effects of nutrients on extending life and the genetic determinants of life span. Indeed, he has discovered the first longevity gene in humans, and is further characterizing the phenotype and genotype of humans with exceptional longevity through an NIH supported Program Project. He is also leading a Program Project to investigate the metabolic decline with aging and its impact on longevity. He received numerous grants, among them ones from the National Institute of Aging (NIA), American Federation of Aging Research, and the Ellison Medical Foundation. Dr. Barzilai has published over 160 peer-reviewed papers, reviews and chapters in textbooks. He is an advisor to the National Institutes of Health on several projects and initiatives and study sections. He serves on several editorial boards and is a reviewer for numerous other journals. Dr. Barzilai was a recipient of numerous prestigious awards, including the Beeson Fellow for Aging Research, the Senior Ellison Foundation award, the Paul Glenn Foundation award and the NIA- Nathan Shock Award for his contributions in elucidating metabolic and genetic mechanisms of aging, and will receive the 2010 Irving S. Wright Award of Distinction in Aging Research Award. In his capacity as the Director of the Institute for Aging research at Einstein he leads or assists in 5 large programmatic (P01) approaches to biology of aging, a training grant (T32) and has additional individual grants (R01). Sample Titles Aging...

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Dr. Roee Holtzer

Dr. Holtzer is an assistant professor of psychology at the Ferkauf Graduate School of Psychology and of Neurology at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University. He holds an MA and a Ph.D. degree from the State University of New York at Binghamton. Dr. Holtzer completed his internship training in clinical psychology at the Rusk Institute of New York University. He also completed a T-32 post-doctoral fellowship in neuropsychology and cognition in aging at the cognitive neuroscience division of the Sergievsky Center of Columbia University Medical Center. He is licensed as a psychologist in New York State. Dr. Holtzer’s primary research interest is in cognitive aging and in the interplay between cognition, mood and motor function vis-à-vis aging and age-related diseases. Specifically, his most recently funded research proposes a three-level theory-driven approach to integrating clinical neuropsychology, cognitive neurosciences, and genetics to explore mechanisms of motor aging. The long-term goal of this translational research is to identify specific modifiable mechanisms pertinent to developing more efficient risk assessment and intervention programs of motor impairments such as decline in gait and falls in aging. Dr. Holtzer has a specific interest in attention and executive control processes and their relations to other cognitive functions, emotions and functional outcomes. His team’s recent work has identified informative associations between executive control of working memory and fatigue in Multiple Sclerosis. They aim to further explore this relationship and extend it to aging as well. Dr. Holtzer is also the director for the Clinical Health Program Minor in Neuropsychology Sample Titles Predictors of Gait and Falling in Aging Central Control of Mobility in...

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Dr. Michael Lipton

Born in Boston and raised in upstate New York and Southern California, Dr. Lipton entered the Six-Year Liberal Arts – Medicine Program at Boston University in 1983. The program, designed to develop humanistic physicians, channeled students toward the liberal arts and clinical medicine. Dr. Lipton minored in Spanish literature with a special interest in contemporary Castilian fiction (Miguel Delibes was a favorite), including study in Salamanca, Spain. Key interests during medical school were the neurosciences and, in particular, brain substrates of psychiatric disease. Nonetheless, the opportunity to exploit technology and treat disease less invasively drew Dr. Lipton to training in Diagnostic Radiology and Neuroradiology. In his first faculty appointment as assistant professor of radiology at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University, through a newly established collaborative relationship between Einstein and the Center for Advanced Brain Imaging (CABI) at the Nathan S. Kline Institute for Psychiatric Research (NKI), Dr. Lipton was immersed in neuroimaging research and developed his own research program. With the support of a National Institutes of Health Mentored Clinical Scientist Career Development Award, he completed a Ph.D. in Neuroscience at Einstein, executing work that redefined our understanding of brain organization using electrical and hemodynamic (MRI) measures. Subsequently, Dr. Lipton was promoted to associate professor of radiology, psychiatry and behavioral sciences and neuroscience at Einstein and named associate director of the Gruss Magnetic Resonance Research Center. In parallel with his basic science work, Dr. Lipton directs a program investigating mild traumatic brain injury and its effects on cognitive disability. Sample Titles Is There Any Such Thing as a Minor Head Injury? Detecting Microscopic Brain Injury in Living Humans Imaging Biomarkers to Improve Patient Care and Facilitate Novel Treatments Safety Issue in MRI: What Everyone Needs to...

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Dr. Richard Zweig

Dr. Zweig is an Associate Professor of Psychology at Yeshiva University. He received his doctoral training in Clinical Psychology at Northwestern University wherein he matriculated through a specialized clinical gero-psychology training program. Following his internship at the Yale University School of Medicine, and a post-doctoral fellowship in medical psychology / neuropsychology at the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, Dr. Zweig obtained specialty training in Klerman/Weissman Interpersonal Psychotherapy (IPT) and manualized Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Late-Life Depression. Dr. Zweig has been a member of the Editorial Board of the Journal of Clinical Geropsychology and the Journal of Mental Health and Aging. From 1995-2001, Dr. Zweig was Senior Staff Psychologist and Coordinator of Geriatric Psychology Extern Training in the Geriatric Psychiatry Division of Hillside Hospital – Long Island Jewish Medical Center. In 2001 Dr. Zweig was recruited by the Ferkauf Graduate School of Yeshiva University to develop and direct the Ferkauf Older Adult Program concentration within the Clinical Psychology Program. In 2002, and from 2003-2006, he was awarded U.S. Dept. of Heath and Human Services Graduate Psychology Education (GPE) grants to train students in gero-psychology, and developed an externship wherein students provide services to older adults in primary care, research clinic, and outpatient clinic settings. Dr. Zweig has written and presented at national meetings on the assessment and treatment of personality-disordered older adults, depression and suicide in the elderly, and gero-psychology training, and he maintains a private practice dedicated to treating adults and older adults. Sample Titles Aging and Mental Health Assessment and Treatment of Personality-Disordered Older Adults Depression and Suicide in the Elderly Gero-Psychology...

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